Circle Layering

Jan 28 2013 Published by under General, JavaScript

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If you were wondering where my last post was heading…

growth

growth2

growth3

growth4

Oops, gotta turn off the “capture cursor” on that screenshot program. :)

Anyway, this was an idea I first explored several years ago on my art from code site, but has been in the back of my mind as something I wanted to play with more. (see: http://www.artfromcode.com/?s=cells) In the end I ditched the whole idea of perfection I was going for in the last post, as the fact of the outer circles having some space at the end gives it a more organic feel. In fact, you can see that I even exaggerated the space in some of the examples. Well, just a quick follow up. Carry on.

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4 responses so far. Comments will be closed after post is one year old.

  • iGman says:

    Really nice effect. I hope to see your self published book about “Playing With Chaos” soon.

  • Romu says:

    Really nice.

    I read your old posts about generative art at that time.

    Any more resources to share with us? I was after some sites 2 days ago to find math algorythm or attractors to experiment from.

    Any new generative art post incoming?

    A long time ago, your book put some formulas in my head that I’m still using every day. You have a thing to make some important math fundamentals accessible to everyone ;)

    I have often have some difficulties to translate pure math to a language to draw, let’s say JavaScript today. Any advice with that way?

    For example, Hard time going from:
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenz_system
    Without finding other posts to extract JavaScript from those formulas.

    Any advice on how to proceed/learn?

    Thanks for the post anyway!

    • keith says:

      Wikipedia and Wolfram are always a good source of fun algorithms to play around with. If you can’t figure out how to convert a formula to JS, just google search the algorithm + javascript. Chances are you aren’t the first one to try it. Take it slow, one step at a time.

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